Skills & Development

10+ Simple Tips for a Great Presentation

Speaking to someone privately is not the same as speaking to an audience during a presentation. That presentation could include a broad spectrum of people with varying interests and attention spans.

Nerves may take control, or you may discover that not everyone is listening, comprehending, or agreeing with you, and you must work harder to engage them.

We have previously underlined the need for speaking or writing with purpose in our tools for effective corporate communications. Determine your objectives: inform, educate, get approval/opinions, convince, influence, or sell. Communications frequently combine these goals.

The only way to make presentations more purposeful and successful is to invest in the appropriate communication skills. However, in this post, we’ll go through 10 easy methods for giving a confident presentation that gets results.

Content List 

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  • Many presenters adhere to the “10-20-30” rule, which states that they should use 10 or fewer slides.
  • Video is an excellent way to learn; studies show it is 95% more effective than text.
  • If you don’t have the funds for a designer, presentation tools like Visme or Canva will help you create amazing slides, while Pexels or Unsplash will provide you with stunning royalty-free photos.

Significance of Giving a Great Presentation

Your presentation is your narrative. What you say matters whether you’re teaching an online course, presenting a webinar, making a business pitch, onboarding a new hire, or discussing a campaign with your team. You need your audience to pay attention. The efficacy of your presentation determines the number of individuals reached by your story. It denotes how much information they will take with them when they depart. It can also assist you in determining what you can do better next time.

Understanding the effectiveness of your presentation can assist you in determining whether or not your content is engaging with the audience. Was the talk too long or too short? Are people getting to the last slide or skipping ahead? What is the lifespan of your content—will your presentation still attract visitors in a month? Is there a particular slide on which folks spent more time than others? All of these factors influence how strong and impactful your presentation is. All of these questions can be answered with presentation analytics.

Related Blog: Checklists Before and After offline Presentations

Why are Improving Presentation Skills Important? 

  • A substantial amount of preparation is usually required to deliver an effective presentation. If you’re standing in front of an audience or leading a webinar, you’re undoubtedly already an expert on the subject. This knowledge should lessen some of your concerns.
  • Those who have to give presentations frequently experience anxiety. While this is a typical worry, turning it into a learning experience can help us grow personally and professionally.
  • Presentations are fantastic opportunities to promote your brand and boost its value inside your business, organization, or new clients and contributors, whether you’re a small nonprofit or a subject matter expert.
  • You may develop some of your leadership qualities while improving your presenting skills by gaining experience speaking in front of others and growing your comfort and understanding of interacting with audience members.
  • Presentation skills are like other skills; the more you practice and use them, the better you will become. 

How to Give a Great Presentation?

  1. Keep your presentation simple

When putting together your presentation, keep in mind that less is more. Many presenters adhere to the “10-20-30” rule, which states that you should utilize 10 or fewer slides, maintain your presentation under 20 minutes, and use a font size of at least 30 points. This structure guarantees that your presentation is clear, concise, and to the point. The effectiveness of your presentation is primarily determined by your voice, explanations, and body language rather than by the presentation contents themselves.

You should also aim to limit your primary points to three or fewer. Mention them at the beginning and end of your presentation to guarantee that the most crucial point is remembered.

  1. Prepare and practice

After you’ve put together your presentation, you should dedicate time to preparing your talking points. To do this, asking a few trusted friends or colleagues to listen to a test run can be helpful. Ask for their honest feedback about your visuals, speaking voice, body language, and other presentation aspects.

Practice but do not memorize your speech. When you memorize every line of your presentation, it’s simple to veer off track if you’re nervous or miss a word. Prepare short talking points that will guide your presentation instead. Speak frankly and confidently about your topic knowledge.

  1. Start strong and tell stories

A good, exciting beginning can help keep your audience’s attention throughout the presentation. Whatever method you use to begin your presentation, ensure it is related to your topic and supports the critical point you want your audience to remember at the end. Here are a few possibilities:

  • Introduce an intriguing issue, challenge, or tale.
  • Mention someone influential or fascinating.
  • Tell a tale that connects to the significant point of your presentation.
  • Display an intriguing statistic, graphic, or image.
  • Play a short movie that introduces your presentation.
  • Make a comment that piques the audience’s interest or shocks them.

Telling stories can help make the concepts, ideas, or facts you’re presenting more relatable. It gives context and assists the audience in better understanding and connecting with your presentation. Again, only tell stories that enhance and reinforce your significant points.

  1. Find a mentor or model yourself after other inspirational people

While you should undoubtedly develop and display your speaking personality, learning from other great speakers can be beneficial. Find someone in your organization who you believe is an excellent presenter and ask them to be your mentor. Make a list of your objectives and what you intend to gain from the relationship.

Many internet courses, workshops, and other resources are also devoted to developing presentation skills. Take the time to observe other presentations and emulate the elements that you find compelling.

  1. Show enthusiasm

Displaying your interest and concern for the topic or information you present will engage and capture the audience’s attention. People appreciate listening to those who are enthusiastic about imparting their knowledge.

  1. Leverage body language, facial expressions, and eye contact

While your presentation’s written and vocal material is crucial, your nonverbal communication should aid complement the information you’re sharing:

Instead of remaining in one spot, wander around the stage or floor where you are presenting calmly. Instead of becoming distracting, make your gestures flow with the message.

If possible, avoid standing behind a podium or table.

Make eye contact with the audience to personalize and conversationalize your presentation.

When conveying an idea or displaying interest in a topic, use gestures and facial expressions to support your points.

To project confidence and make the audience feel welcome, stand up straight with your shoulders back and arms unfolded.

  1. Make use of visuals

Use visual aids in your presentation if they can help to support or illustrate a subject. While slides often accompany your presentation visually, infographics, charts, images, movies, sketches, or renderings might also be helpful. If it complicates or complicates things, keep your presentation straightforward and accessible.

  1. Make use of your voice

Using a powerful speaking voice is one approach to help your listeners. You mustn’t make your audience strain to hear you or struggle to focus on a loudspeaker.

It is a good idea to practice your presentation in advance with trustworthy friends or colleagues who can provide feedback on your speaking voice. Consider employing a microphone if you’re having trouble maintaining a confident, calm tone at a reasonable volume. Test the microphone and associated electronics ahead of time.

  1. Support your audience

While creating and delivering your presentation, keep the audience in mind by asking, “What would make this learning experience the most pleasurable and effective possible?” This could include going over a problematic idea in greater depth, moving around the stage, or allowing your audience to engage in some way.

Throughout your presentation, be honest and sincere, connecting and conversing with your audience. Always speak “to” your audience rather than “at” them.

  1. Enjoy yourself and relax

It is a significant accomplishment to create and convey information to one, several, or a large group of people. Have fun during the process—it will help your presentation. If you’re nervous, stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, fists on your hips, chin held high, and a pleasant smile. This boosts confidence while calming nerves. Take a few deep breaths.

Reward yourself in some meaningful way after your presentation. Be proud of your accomplishment and, when you’re ready, solicit candid feedback to improve your next presentation.

Should You Improvise Your Presentation Skills? 

When it comes to structuring, all presentations should begin with a slide that introduces the presentation, followed by a slide that explains what people may expect to learn throughout the presentation. The final slide should thank everyone for their time and ask if they have any questions. Are you utilizing software with which you are unfamiliar? Perhaps this is your first time presenting through video call. Practising lets, you understand how this will operate and decreases the likelihood of a technical issue when the big day arrives. As crucial as prompts are for a good presentation, don’t read from them throughout. If you write down what you’re going to say, you’ll be tempted to read directly from your notes, making you appear unprepared and unpracticed.

If your presentation is in person, arriving early allows you to look out the venue, set up the presentation, and distribute any handouts. Attending the video conference early for online presentations will enable you to show your screen, test the technology, and soothe any jitters before you begin. Take a few deep breaths before you start. This should help you focus, calm your heart rate, and allow you to speak more clearly and loudly. Allow brief pauses before going on to the next topic in your presentation. This will enable folks to process what you’ve just started, ask questions, and finish whatever notes they take.

Conclusion

Understanding the effectiveness of your presentation can assist you in determining whether or not your content is engaging with the audience. You may develop some of your leadership qualities while improving your presenting skills by gaining experience speaking in front of others and growing your comfort and understanding of interacting with audience members. Whatever method you use to begin your presentation, ensure it is related to your topic and supports the critical point you want your audience to remember at the end. Displaying your interest and concern for the topic or information you present will engage and capture the audience’s attention. While creating and delivering your presentation, keep the audience in mind by asking, “What would make this learning experience the most pleasurable and effective possible?” This could include going over a problematic idea in greater depth, moving around the stage, or allowing your audience to engage in some way.

FAQs 

  1. What are three things that make a good presentation?

When it comes to what you have to say, divide it into three primary sections: an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. A fascinating beginning. Your introduction should summarise what you’re going to discuss and why it’s beneficial or essential to your audience. Provide a body of evidence.

  1. How can I improve my presentation skills?
  1. Present helpful information
  2. See how the experts do it 
  3. Learn it without notes
  4. Watch yourself in the mirror
  5. Use your presentation as an opportunity
  6. Give yourself time to prepare
  7. Use a visual aid
  8. Practice positive thinking

     3.  What are the four keys that make for a good presentation?

Four keys will help your audience follow along and remember your presentation: content, audience, structure, and consistency.

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